Innovation Forum

Innovation Forum

The GFFA Innovation Forum is an exhibition format presenting practical examples, innovative solutions and scientific findings related to the GFFA conference theme. Around 30 scientific institutions, NGOs, companies including start-ups, authorities and associations will present their innovations and activities.

GFFA 2024 - Innovation Forum

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty, Supporting resilient and sustainable supply chains, Reducing food loss and waste, Strengthening vulnerable groups.

Project Description

UNIDO wants to showcase best practice cases within the agenda of “A world without hunger is possible”.

UNIDO fosters innovative approaches to building human capital and raising productivity, in particular through vocational and entrepreneurship training and industrial skills development in partnership with the private sector. UNIDOs activities contribute to food security, poverty reduction, youth employment, women’s economic empowerment, addressing the root causes of migration at the origin, and driving growth in productivity and employment, and creating prosperity in rural communities.

One of UNIDOs recent projects is “Finding sustainability measures to improve the Ethiopian Coffee Value through private partnerships” in cooperation with the Ethiopian Coffee and Tea Authority (ECTA) and illycaffé (Ernesto Illy Foundation). Within the project’s lifespan of 6,5 years, UNIDO has intensively worked on upgrading technical capacity of Ethiopian institutions at the national level, leveraging ECTAs positioning in the global coffee arena. Through the support of actors along the entire Ethiopian coffee value chain, from coffee plantation to export companies, by developing knowledge and entrepreneurial skills, the income of small holder farmers increased, contributing to food security and sustainably impacting social, environmental and economic welfare of rural communities.

(Kindly note a brochure of all projects was shared via mail)

About the Institution

UNIDO is a specialized agency of the United Nations with a unique mandate to promote, sustainable and inclusive industrial development contributing to all Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with more focus on the sustainable development goals, 1, 2, 4, and 7 more specifically SDG 9: “Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation”.

UNIDO’s priorities include “A World Without Hunger”, sustainable, fair and transparent supply chains and trade, stopping climate breakdown by promoting renewable energy and energy efficiency to reduce industrial greenhouse gas emissions and preserve scarce resources.

UNIDO promotes sustainable, inclusive and responsible investment in agriculture and agribusiness through value chain development, to create shared prosperity and advance economic competitiveness. Through a range of technical cooperation services targeted at food and non-food sectors, the division of agribusiness and infrastructure development assists developing countries to add value to their agricultural output and generate off-farm employment opportunities in rural communities, thereby contributing to rural economic development and structural transformation.

Contact Person: Dejene Tezera

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty, Supporting resilient and sustainable supply chains, Reducing food loss and waste, Strengthening vulnerable groups.

Project Description

„A world without hunger“ (SDG2) is an important aim of the German development cooperation (GDC) and GIZ as implementing agency. Several goals need to be achieved simultaneously: sufficient and healthy diets for all people, the sustainable management natural resources within planetary boundaries, the adaptation to climate change and securing the livelihoods for people working in the food system. The two projects described are exemplary for German development approaches.

The global project “Food and Nutrition Security Enhanced Resilience” supports dietary diversity, as nutrient-dense food is the key for development and health. It focuses on women and children – the most effective investment in the future. The project works in agriculture, sanitation/water, nutritional counselling, health, education and social protection and links them with one another.

The global project “Transformation of Food Systems” supports transformative initiatives working towards healthier and more sustainable food systems in Zambia, Malawi and India. The project creates opportunities for dialogues with the stakeholders, especially women and vulnerable groups, to identify approaches and cooperates with supra-regional networks. To develop the required competencies and optimise processes, the project offers advisory and facilitation services. The approaches are communicated to the public to mobilise the society and the politicians to transform our food systems.

About the Institution

The Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH is a global service provider in the field of international cooperation for sustainable development and international education work, with 25.422 employees. GIZ has over 50 years of experience in a wide variety of areas, including economic development and employment, energy and the environment, and peace and security. Our business volume is around 4 billion euros. As a public-benefit federal enterprise, GIZ supports the German Government – in particular the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) – and many public and private sector clients in around 120 countries in achieving their objectives in international cooperation. With this aim, GIZ works together with its partners to develop effective solutions that offer people better prospects and sustainably improve their living conditions.

Contact Person: Dr. Gerd Fleischer

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty, Reducing food loss and waste.

Project Description

Extreme weather conditions, the increasingly environmental impact of intensive agriculture and the consequences of climate change will make protein production more difficult in the future and thus the secure supply of high-quality, and safe food to the growing world population. This contradicts the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) adopted by the UN, in particular the goal of »zero hunger« (SDG 2). For this reason, it is necessary to develop new resilient and sustainable protein sources from plants, algae, insects and fungi as an alternative to animal foods and thus offer a solution for sustainable development.

As part of the Fraunhofer lighthouse project »FutureProteins«, six Fraunhofer institutes are working together to develop new, innovative cultivation systems, extraction processes and processing methods to make plant, fungal, insect and algae proteins usable for the production of sensory-appealing, sustainable and protein-rich foods (https://www.ime.fraunhofer.de/en/trends/futureproteins.html). The focus of developments is on the development of closed agricultural systems and the valuable use of side streams from primary production or ingredient processing into protein-rich ingredients for an environmentally friendly and sustainable supply. The main challenge is to develop economically efficient and industrially implementable systems and processes.

The research focuses on plants (e.g. potatoes, wheatgrass and alfalfa), insects, filamentous fungi and microalgae. In addition to a high-quality and balanced amino acid profile and good processing properties, the sensory properties of alternative proteins are crucial for their use in food. All of the protein sources mentioned have their own taste and odor profile, which consumers are often not familiar with. Part of the project is therefore to improve sensory properties of alternative protein raw materials and thus make them usable for food. In the spirit of sustainability, »FutureProteins« is developing four closed cultivation systems (vertical farming for growing plants, insect farming, bioreactors for filamentous fungi and photobioreactors for microalgae) that make year-round and climate-independent production possible.

For plants, the new OrbiPlant® Vertical Farming System was developed, which can reduce water consumption by 95% and fertilizer requirements by up to 50%, and completely avoid pesticide use. The OrbiPlant® system has now been licensed out for commercial use. To reduce energy use and further increase the cost efficiency of vertical farming, scientists are developing a hybrid lighting system for the plants that dynamically combines sunlight and LED lighting as part of »FutureProteins«.

»FutureProteins«also develops processing processes specifically tailored to the protein raw materials in order to develop functionally- and sensory-appealing protein ingredients with a high level of consumer acceptance. The most promising protein ingredients are then used in food. For example, baked goods and breakfast cereals with wheatgrass proteins and vegan meat alternatives with filamentous fungis were developed, which, in addition to a balanced amino acid profile and an appealing taste, can also represent a valuable alternative to animal foods and thus contribute to supplying the world’s population with high-quality and safe food the new closed agricultural systems.
In addition, the developed agricultural systems and protein production processes are assessed in terms of their use of resources and their sustainability in comparison to conventional production. Closing material and energy cycles is also part of the »FutureProteins« lighthouse project.

About the Institution

The Fraunhofer Society is European’s leading organization for applied research and stands for innovation and excellence. Within the lighthouse project »FutureProteins«, the two renowned Fraunhofer institutes IVV (Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering and Packaging) and IME (Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology) work closely together with four other Fraunhofer institutes.

Together they are dedicated to the development of closed agricultural systems, the processing of protein-rich plants, insects, filamentous fungi and microalgae into protein ingredients as well as the development of innovative foods and the evaluation of the systems with regard to sustainability. This research effort is part of the Fraunhofer Agriculture and Food Industry Alliance, a network of 13 institutions and experts dedicated to addressing challenges in the food industry.

The Fraunhofer Agriculture and Food Industry Alliance strives to make the diet of the future more sustainable and healthier by relying on the most modern technologies and scientific findings. The Fraunhofer Institutes IVV and IME significantly contribute to realizing the alliance’s vision by developing innovative solutions for food production and laying the foundations for sustainable and healthy nutrition.

Contact Person: Dr. Stephanie Mittermaier

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty.

Project Description

Africa Agriculture Watch – Leveraging Artificial Intelligence (AI) & Satellite Remote Sensing Data for Sustainable and Resilient Agriculture

Amid the numerous threats facing Africa’s agricultural sector, from supply chain disruptions to extreme climate events and variabilities and health crises, there is an urgent need for accurate, timely, and disaggregated data for tailored intervention planning. However, data analytics with predictability capabilities are not often readily accessible to decision-makers and policymakers across Africa. In response to the agricultural data gap, AKADEMIYA2063 scientists devised a new tool, which uses cutting-edge machine learning predictive modeling technologies and satellite remotely sensed data to predict food crop production for nine key crops across 47 African countries at the pixel level and weeks before the harvesting periods.

The web-based Africa Agriculture Watch (AAgWa) platform harnesses remote sensing and machine learning techniques to support crisis management, preparedness, monitoring, and mitigation efforts in African food production systems. The tool has provided predictions for agricultural production on key crops for African food production, including maize, cassava, and sorghum.

Through its crop prediction calendars and agricultural production forecast briefs, AAgWa’s innovative interventions promote sustainable production and food sovereignty, especially amid a context of volatility, while equipping policymakers with a decision-support tool. AAgWa is the fourth core program of AKADEMIYA2063, a pan-African non-profit research organization whose mission is to create state-of-the-art technical capacities to support AU Member States to achieve the key goals of Agenda 2063 of transforming national economies to boost economic growth and prosperity. Visit https://www.aagwa.org/.

About the Institution

AKADEMIYA2063 is a pan-African non-profit research organization with headquarters in Kigali, Rwanda and a regional office in Dakar, Senegal. Inspired by the ambitions of the African Union’s Agenda 2063 and grounded in the recognition of the central importance of strong knowledge and evidence-based systems, AKADEMIYA2063’s vision is an Africa with the expertise we need for the Africa we want. This expertise must be responsive to the continent’s needs for data and analysis to ensure high-quality policy design and execution. Inclusive, evidence-informed policymaking is key to meeting the continent’s development aspirations, creating wealth, and improving livelihoods. AKADEMIYA2063’s mission is to create state-of-the-art technical capacities to support African Union Member States’ efforts to achieve the key goals of Agenda 2063 of transforming national economies to boost economic growth and prosperity. The main goal of AKADEMIYA2063 is to help meet Africa’s needs in data, analytics, and mutual learning for the effective implementation of Agenda 2063 and the realization of its outcomes by a critical mass of countries. AKADEMIYA2063 strives to meet its goals through programs organized under five strategic areas—policy innovation, knowledge systems, capacity creation and deployment, operational support, and data management, digital products, and technology—as well as innovative partnerships and outreach activities.

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty, Strengthening vulnerable groups.

Project Description

Agri-Intelligence and Learning Assistant (AILA)

Founded with a vision to revolutionize the agricultural sector, AILA integrates advanced Artificial Intelligence (AI) with timeless farming knowledge. Our primary objective is to empower small-scale farmers globally, ensuring they have access to tools and expertise previously reserved for large-scale operations. Committed to a world without hunger, our platform offers real-time, data-driven advice, facilitating optimal crop selection, yield prediction, and profitability.

In alignment with the GFFA 2024 focus, “Future Food Systems: United for a World Without Hunger”, AILA presents a digital farming assistant designed to bridge knowledge gaps in agriculture. Through advanced AI analytics, AILA advises farmers on best practices, sustainable methodologies, and market insights. With a user-friendly interface, our platform provides 24/7 support, ensuring farmers make informed decisions, leading to increased yields and sustainable practices. AILA is more than a tool; it’s a commitment to sustainable, prosperous farming, uniting communities toward a hunger-free future.

About the Institution

The Southern Africa Agricultural Initiative (Saai) is a pivotal organization dedicated to championing the interests and rights of family farmers in the Southern African region. Established in response to the growing challenges facing smallholder and family farmers, Saai aims to create a more inclusive and sustainable agricultural sector. The initiative recognizes the immense potential of family farming in ensuring food security, promoting economic growth, and preserving cultural heritage.

By fostering partnerships, advocating for favorable policies, and providing essential resources, Saai has made notable strides in bolstering the family farming community. The organization understands the complex interplay of socio-economic and environmental factors that influence agriculture in the region and strives to equip its members with the knowledge and tools they need to thrive.

One of Saai’s core objectives is to bridge the gap between policy-makers and farmers, ensuring that the latter’s voices are heard in crucial decision-making processes. They also emphasize the importance of sustainable farming practices, aiming to balance economic gains with ecological preservation. Through education, networking, and active engagement with both the public and private sectors, Saai remains at the forefront of transforming Southern Africa’s agricultural landscape.

Contact Person: Francois Rossouw

Selected Topic

Supporting resilient and sustainable supply chains.

Project Description

Strong farmer organisations are the basis for food sovereignty and sustainable production, as well as for sustainably functioning supply chains. The PAFO exchange platform was therefore established to strengthen “learning from each other”. The Pan-African Farmers’ Organisation PAFO thus offers its member organisations (regional and national farmers’ organisations) the opportunity to exchange views on important issues in a virtual space (e.g. on advocacy, climate, trade, …). In this way, strong solutions are identified among some and shared with others. Or new solutions are developed together. The format is accompanied by PAFO’s own facilitators. Through the peer-to-peer approach, which is supported by the AHA in the framework of a BMZ-funded project, internal resources are mobilised in an appreciative way and thus strengthened more effectively.

About the Institution

Andreas Hermes Akademie (AHA) is the further education institution of the German Farmers Association DBV. With financial support of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development BMZ, AHA has been working since 2015 with FOs on all levels to strengthen their capacities for better lobbying and service provision for the benefit of their members.

Contact Person: Dr. Julian Friesinger

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty, Reducing food loss and waste.

Project Description

BCG: Thailand’s Food and Agricultural Industry

The Thai government adopted the BCG (Bio-Circular-Green) Economic Model as its main national agenda. As a representative of Thai government abroad, the Royal Thai Embassy in Berlin is committed to promote the said policy to raise awareness in the international forums as it is a way forward for Thailand.

BCG means growth, better income, better production, and better quality of life, all while protecting our planet. It is imperative that we remain at the forefront of the sustainability frontier, both for our development and for a brighter tomorrow. This is truly the future of food and agriculture in Thailand.

This year, our booth will present 3 selected BCG innovative agricultural based companies as Thailand’s showcase on eco-friendly businesses and innovations in food and agriculture; namely, DistarFresh, a vertical farming company, Happy Grocers, an e-grocery store, and Ricult, an agricultural fintech– digital financial solutions for farmers.

Explore more at our booth in the GFFA2024, Innovation Forum!

About the Institution

The Royal Thai Embassy, Berlin, is a the representative of the Government of Thailand in Germany. The mission of the Embassy is not only to promote cooperation between Thailand and Germany, but also to present Thailand’s SEPs practice to the international forum with the focus on agricultural sustainability and innovation policy.

https://www.thailandnow.in.th/business-investment/the-bcg-impact-on-thailands-food-industry/

About the Institution

What is the SWG?

The “SWG” stands for Regional Rural Development Standing Working Group in South Eastern Europe. It is an International Intergovernmental Organization consisted of governmental institutions responsible for agriculture and rural development in respective countries and territories.

It is a platform for networking and regional co – operation among the SEE countries and territories in the field of agriculture and rural development.

It was founded on the basis of a common wish to establish an organization for sustainable rural development in SEE. As an organization the SWG is a non-political body, acting in a spirit of friendship and good neighborliness and enhances mutual respect and confidence, dialogue and cooperation among the Member Institutions.

Contact Person: Bogdanka Leveska Gjorshoska

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty, Supporting resilient and sustainable supply chains, Strengthening vulnerable groups.

Project Description

At the Innovation forum, Arla Foods would like to open a window into the activities of its Innovation Farms Network across Europe and its Demonstration Farm in Nigeria, which have been established to promote sustainable production and food sovereignty in developing countries, to support the development of resilient and sustainable supply chains in Europe and beyond, while strengthening vulnerable groups.

The European dairy cooperative, Arla Foods, which includes more than 1,400 farmer owners from Germany, is collaborating with farms in different ways to accelerate agricultural progress and support our farmer owners to drive the future of dairy. We have therefore established a network of Innovation Farms to highlight our on-farm activities and demonstrate how Arla is leading the sustainable dairy agenda, today and in the future. We have Innovation farms in UK, Denmark, Sweden and lastly we have also opened an Innovation farm in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. The aim is to: Demonstrate scientific evidence and test new concepts and technology inspire and bring the dairy industry partners together to find the solutions that we need in order to become more sustainable and carbon neutral by 2050.

Apart from the Innovation Farms in our core markets in Europe, we have also developed a Demonstration Farm Concept for our activities in developing countries. In March 2023 Arla Foods cemented its commitment to support local dairy development in Nigeria with inauguration of state-of-the-art farm. Besides housing 216 dairy cows, with the capacity to expand to 750 cows, the Nigerian Demonstration Farm’s main purpose is to facilitate training sessions for local farmers, students and associates at agricultural universities, veterinary students and other relevant groups. The main focus will be on farm management and animal welfare and the training sessions will revolve around feed efficiency, protein efficiency, animal robustness, fertilizer management and land use management.

The farm is the third pillar of Arla’s commitment to the development of the dairy sector in Nigeria and it both builds on top of and taps into the targets of the other two. The first step was The Milky Way Partnership, a public-private partnership, which Arla established in 2016 together with a broad range of stakeholders. The aim was to improve livelihoods and efficiency for local smallholder farmers by capacity building and providing access to basic primary materials. More than 4,200 local farmers took part in the in the training sessions and they have seen an increase in their income of 200 per cent. As a second step Arla expanded on its commitment to develop a sustainable local dairy sector in Nigeria in 2019 by entering into a partnership with the Kaduna State government to establish the Damau Household Milk Farm, a 8,200-hectare ranch project which aims to settle 1000 nomadic dairy farmer households, improve their farming practices and provide a route-to-market for their milk, which goes into production of local dairy products.

About the Institution

Arla Foods is an European dairy cooperative owned by nearly 8,500 Arla farmers from Germany, Denmark, Great Britain, Sweden and BENELUX. The company, with 20,000 employees, generated global sales of 13.8 billion euros in 2022. Arla products are sold in approximately 140 countries around the world and is World largest producer of organic dairy. Germany is not just a market, it’s a home. In Germany, Arla Foods is among the top five dairies & is known under brands such as Arla Bio, Buko & Kærgården. Arla has around 1,650 employees in two dairy plants (Pronsfeld, Rhineland-Palatinate & Upahl, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania) & headquarter in Düsseldorf. Around 1,400 German farmers owners from the West & the North supply milk to the two dairies. Together with our farmer owners, we want to drive the transition to a more sustainable dairy production. To this end, we have set ourselves ambitious, science-based climate targets for 2030, which have been officially endorsed by the global independent SBTi. Arla pursues an ambitious sustainability agenda: by 2030, CO2e emissions in production, logistics fleet & energy use are to be reduced by 63%, on farms by 30% . By 2050, Arla aims to achieve net zero CO2e emissions.

Contact Person: Kasper Thormod Nielsen

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty, Supporting resilient and sustainable supply chains, Strengthening vulnerable groups.

Project Description

“Partnerships for resilient food systems”
These companies will present their innovative projects: GRIMME, PÖTTINGER, Peterson, BayWa, BASF, DLG.

“African Agricenter of Excellence (AAE)” in Kenya and Tanzania
Supporting local dealers to establish leasing models for agri-machinery.

Providing training and know-how transfer on mechanization.

Supporting smallholder farmers in India
Transforming local food system by helping smallholders to become agri-entrepreneurs through commercial vegetable growing.

Fostering food security and strengthening farmer resilience to climate volatility.

Climate smart onion production by smallholder farmers in Ethiopia
Enabling seedling growers to commercialize onion seedlings and local farmers to generate multiple harvests using innovative and climate adapted technology.

Establishing a business model rooted in community partnership and local job creation.

Sustainable sourcing using regenerative farming methods
Practices like cover cropping, rotational grazing or minimal tillage have great potential to resulting in increased yields, healthier crops, and resilient landscapes.

Projects along the value chain show how regenerative farming methods can impact global food systems, climate change mitigation, and rural communities.

Supporting coffee growers in Mexico
Bringing innovation to coffee growers while respecting the legacy of indigenous communities in the State of Chiapas.

Working along coffee value chain with UNESCO and partners for improving growers’ quality of life through increasing coffee yield and quality.

Resource efficient water management and irrigation solutions in Zambia

About the Institution

The German Agribusiness Alliance (GAA) is a joint initiative of leading associations and companies in the German agricultural and food industry focusing on plant breeding, plant protection and plant nutrition, animal husbandry (genetics, health and nutrition), agricultural technology, food production, certification, agricultural trade, qualification and training, as well as agri-related consulting and advisory. It serves as a platform for international cooperation of the German business in the agricultural and food sector – with partner countries worldwide.

Contact Person: Alina Gumpert

Selected Topic

Reducing food loss and waste.

Project Description

For food systems to be resilient, we need efficient local and adapted agriculture. The agricultural products produced by farmers/families in Africa suffer from heavy post-harvest losses. Today, 30-50% of products still spoil after harvesting due to lack of processing facilities. Farmers have to sell at poor prices during the harvest. The value added and the income opportunities are taken away from the producer/farmer. It is important that we train and educate farmers better and transfer our knowledge. We have to offer customer-, country- and market-specific machines that make agriculture in Africa better and more efficient. We have adapted our programme and a large number of machines to local needs. For example, we have small manual and electric maize sheller so that the women in the village do not have to gin the grains by hand. We have developed small mobile dryers that can be used in the sense of a machinery ring or village communities. It is immensely important to make agricultural products storable after the harvest so that the products can be processed later. Only with adapted education and training, adapted technology is a sustainable and safe food supply possible.

About the Institution

Riela Africa is a subsidiary of RIELA Karl-Heinz-Knoop e.K. founded in 2021. RIELA is a major manufacturer of machinery and equipment for grain processing. This includes silo conveying and drying plants, as well as grinding and mixing plants for the production of animal feed.

The range of products also includes belt drying plants and push-turn dryers for the drying of biomass or foodstuffs.
RIELA has set itself the goal of offering its customers energy-efficient products and also demanding energy-efficient and sustainable production from itself.

Contact Person: Klaus Kunkemöller

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty, Supporting resilient and sustainable supply chains, Strengthening vulnerable groups.

Project Description

As part of the Innovation and Transformation Dialogue (ITD) of the Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (BMEL), IAK Agrar Consulting GmbH has been conducting a project on duckweed since the summer of 2023, the “Innovation Dialogue on the Introduction of Duckweed as an Ecological and Plant-Based Protein Alternative in Brazil”.

The background is that the globally dominant cultivation and production methods for obtaining animal and plant protein are not sustainable. This is no different in Brazil. The cultivation of commodities such as soy, for example, has led to severe deforestation in the past. Although not the main culprits, small and medium-sized peasant farms are particularly affected by these developments as a vulnerable group and increasingly have to abandon their farms and migrate.

Duckweed is a protein-rich plant that has been used for thousands of years, mainly for feeding livestock. Over time, it was pushed back by soy. It was only a few years ago that it was rediscovered by researchers as a supplement to soy feed. As a relatively undemanding plant, e.g., with regard to location, it is ideally suited for smallholder production, even in non-agricultural favourable locations that are already strongly affected by climate change. It can provide an alternative source of income for smallholder farmers in these areas.

IAK is piloting the project in the north-east of Brazil in cooperation with the Pernambuco Agricultural Research Institute (IPA), the University of Serra Talhada, the local municipality of Mirandiba and numerous small and medium-sized agricultural producers and farmers. The aim of local investments is to ensure that the entire value chain is in the hands of small and medium-sized farmers. The economy takes place on a comparatively small spatial scale and is thus more sustainable and resilient to global externalities.

About the Institution

IAK Agrar Consulting GmbH (IAK), headquartered in Leipzig, is an independent agricultural consultancy that has been active in international cooperation and private sector consultancy in Germany and abroad for over 40 years. Its clients in international cooperation include, e.g. BMEL, GIZ, EU and World Bank. Also, IAK works for private clients and for organisations, associations, municipalities and administrations. International cooperation focuses on creating better livelihoods for all through sustainable agricultural and food systems. Other focal points of the IAK’s wide-ranging projects include agricultural policy, food security, biodiversity, bioeconomy, organic farming, agriculture and climate change, digitalisation, rural development, agricultural trade, agricultural skills development and gender equality in the agricultural and food sector. We support small and medium-sized farms and enterprises, service providers and cooperatives in agricultural and food systems along the entire value chain in their sustainable development and transformation. We follow a holistic approach to sustainability, which focuses on three areas:

Economics – to maintain an economically viable business model
Ecology – in particular to adapt to climate change and achieve greenhouse gas reduction targets
Social – to create attractive and fair working conditions.

This also includes advising various institutions from politics and administration and organising knowledge transfer platforms.

IAK Agrar Consulting GmbH: https://www.iakleipzig.de/leistungen/internationale-zusammenarbeit
APD-Brasil: https://de.apdbrasil.de/

Contact Person: Syman Jurk

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty, Reducing food loss and waste.

Project Description

CAISLEY further supports partners in the implementation of projects that build on a unique, lifelong animal identification that can be used for different applications – the so-called “multi-purpose LITS”. Currently, various pilot measures are being carried out in Africa, the Caucasus region and Central Asia. This includes use cases for the collection of data on milk yield, growth development and reproduction, the further breeding development of large and small livestock populations, animal health measures and the prevention of animal theft. In this regard, CAISLEY has been working for many years with ADT Project Consulting GmbH, which plans, prepares and implements comprehensive LITS. Examples are projects in Tanzania, Ethiopia, Jamaica and Suriname.

In addition, CAISLEY supports the African Dairy Genetic Gains (ADDG) program of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) in Ethiopia and Kenya through the National Animal Genetic Improvement Institute (NAGII) and the Kenya Livestock Breeders Association (KLBA) with its animal identification products, thus directly contributing to the formation of sustainable production systems that are better adapted to local conditions. In this context the use of the Caisley tissue sampling tag for genotyping offers an additional opportunity, especially for smaller, local populations, to contribute to their conservation and biodiversity. In Nigeria, we are working with the National Animal Biotechnology Development Agency (NABDA) to further develop the local Bunaji and Gudali cattle breeds. Since this year in Zambia small-scale dairy farmers have been using the CAISLEY animal identification products through the PAW Veterinary Group Ltd to manage their herds in a more needs-based and healthy way, reducing animal losses and underperformance caused by disease.

About the Institution

CAISLEY is the leading manufacturer of animal identification products in Germany with growing market shares in EU countries and abroad. The family-owned company, based in Bocholt in North Rhine-Westphalia, has been dedicated to the animal identification of farm animals for more than 30 years. CAISLEY’s visual ear tags, electronic ear tags with transponder and tissue-sampling ear tags are currently used in more than 70 countries worldwide. CAISLEY products are known for their animal-friendly design, high quality standards and exceptionally low loss rates. As an associate member of ICAR, CAISLEY offers ear tags that are approved by the International Committee for Animal Recording (ICAR) and are widely used in official national livestock identification and traceability systems. CAISLEY’s products are suitable for a unique lifetime identification of livestock, ideally from birth to slaughter. In this way, they help to manage livestock in a resource-efficient and sustainable way, strengthen their health and effectively combat animal diseases, prevent animal theft and avoid conflicts between livestock farmers and crop producers.

Contact Person: Dr. Ferdinand Schmitt

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty, Supporting resilient and sustainable supply chains, Reducing food loss and waste, Strengthening vulnerable groups.

Project Description

ATS Animal Traceability Solutions

With ATS, ADT and its partners offer a unique approach to the development and implementation of live animal traceability solutions. At its heart is the ATS platform, which is characterised by two key features:
– “parametrisation” – the core modules of the application are designed to be very flexible to adapt and design to different countries and facilities by modulating key parameters, rather than developing the full source code each time.
– “Open source” – the modular software architecture integrates the very specific functionalities of animal identification and traceability with the best available open source solutions for common functions such as user management, entitlement management, processing of GIS-related information, document management or reporting.

The development of the ATS application was supported by the German Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (BMEL) under the Innovation Programme managed by the Federal Agency for Agriculture and Food (BLE) and has already been successfully implemented in several countries (including Ethiopia, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, Suriname and Jamaica).

More information about ATS can be found here: https://www.animaltraceabilitysolutions.net/

German-Ukrainian expert dialogue on sustainable development of the fruit and vegetable sector

Within the framework of the BMEL’s Bilateral Cooperation Programme, ADT is conducting the “German-Ukrainian Expert Dialogue on Sustainable Development of the Fruit and Vegetable Sector in Vinnytsia” (DUALOG).

The aim of the project is the sustainable development of the fruit and vegetable sector in Ukraine, and specifically in the Vinnytsia oblast, in order to compensate for lost cultivation areas in the context of the ongoing war in eastern Ukraine and to ensure self-sufficiency.

The project pursues a holistic multi-level approach to strengthen the fruit and vegetable sector as a unity of policy, administration, teaching, extension and private sector production with a strictly regional approach.

Planned results:
– Result area 1: The legal and institutional framework for the production and marketing of fruit and vegetables in Vinnytsia oblast is strengthened.
– Result area 2: The offer in the field of vocational education and training as well as agricultural extension with regard to fruit and vegetable production in the Vinnytsia oblast is improved.
– Result area 3: Instruments for the financial promotion of strategic agricultural investments and business start-ups in the fruit and vegetable sector in the Vinnytsia oblast have been developed and implemented.

Target groups:
– Teachers and managers of the Illintsi Agricultural College (Illintsi)
– Graduates and selected units of the Illintsi Agricultural College in Vinnytsia in the fruit and vegetable sector (who benefit directly from the financial support under results area 3)
– Selected fruit and vegetable producers and other sector actors in Vinnytsia (who directly benefit from financial support under results area 3).
– Technical and managerial staff of the relevant departments of MAPE and MBW in the regional state administration of Vinnytsia oblast.
– Representatives of selected Territorial Communities (TGs) in Vinnytsia Oblast
– Staff of the Scientific and Methodological Centre for Higher and Secondary Vocational Education (WMZ VFPO)

More information about DUALOG can be found here: https://dualog-ukraine.de/

About the Institution

ADT Project Consulting GmbH (ADT) is a German consulting firm focusing on the planning and implementation of international projects in the agricultural sector. For more than 27 years, ADT has been active in over 70 countries in the context of development cooperation, economic cooperation and/or innovation promotion for various donors as well as for companies and associations in the agricultural and food sector.

ADT’s core technical competencies lie in its know-how on sustainable production systems and value chains in agriculture and animal husbandry, in excellent technical advice and training, as well as in the planning and development of specialised systems for animal health and food safety control, quality assurance in agricultural value chains, and traceability and origin assurance of agricultural products.

Special experience exists in the implementation of nationwide or regional training projects in the agricultural sector for various target groups, in the establishment of agricultural centres, and in advising ministries of education and agriculture on the modernisation of vocational education and training. Furthermore, there is also a well-founded competence in the methodological-didactic field as well as in the implementation of high quality standards in the vocational training of specialists and managers in the sector.

Contact Person: Aigul Lennartz

Selected Topic

Reducing food loss and waste.

Project Description

According to the FAO, approaching SDG 12.3 “Halving food waste and reducing food losses by 2030” would also have a positive impact on 13 other SDGs. Through measures such as reducing post-harvest losses, establishing and expanding cold chains, adequate storage structures, optimizing process chains, cooperation in the supply chain and educating consumers, more high-quality food is available regionally, resources are saved and supply chains becoming more resilient and sustainable. This can reduce costs in the long term and improve access to food, which in the models used also has an impact on reducing global hunger. The aim of the stand as part of the innovation forum is not only to present the initiative’s cooperation, but also the activities of the partner organizations in their countries. A GFFA expert panel was submitted with colleagues from Brazil, Germany and Zimbabwe, the depth of information from which will be increased by the stand and expanded to include other cooperating countries and organizations. If the submission is selected, print materials, posters and other media are planned as sources of information. An exemplary coverage along the entire value chain on all five continents can be expected. Multilingual informants are available for the international audience and can answer questions in at least 7 languages.

About the Institution

thinkstep-anz is an environmental consultancy founded in 2006 in Perth, Western Australia as a subsidiary of PE International. Today, more than 50 passionate experts in Australia and New Zealand care not only about doing the right thing, but also about doing things right. We work with farmers, food industry associations, and government agencies to ensure that we produce sufficient food and sustainably. Our work include environmental impact assessment, product footprint assessment and life cycle assessments.

Contact Person: Dr. Felicitas Schneider

Selected Topic

Reducing food loss and waste.

Project Description

According to the FAO, approaching SDG 12.3 “Halving food waste and reducing food losses by 2030” would also have a positive impact on 13 other SDGs. Through measures such as reducing post-harvest losses, establishing and expanding cold chains, adequate storage structures, optimizing process chains, cooperation in the supply chain and educating consumers, more high-quality food is available regionally, resources are saved and supply chains becoming more resilient and sustainable. This can reduce costs in the long term and improve access to food, which in the models used also has an impact on reducing global hunger. The aim of the stand as part of the innovation forum is not only to present the initiative’s cooperation, but also the activities of the partner organizations in their countries. A GFFA expert panel was submitted with colleagues from Brazil (Embrapa), Australia (thinkstep anz) and Zimbabwe, the depth of information from which will be increased by the stand and expanded to include other cooperating countries and organizations. If the submission is selected, print materials, posters and other media are planned as sources of information. An exemplary coverage along the entire value chain on all five continents can be expected. Multilingual informants are available for the international audience and can answer questions in at least 7 languages.

About the Institution

The Collaboration Initiative Food Losses and Waste was launched at the Meeting of Agricultural Chief Scientists G20 in 2015. The coordinator of the international initiative is based at the Thünen Institute of Market Analysis and has been working in the subject area since 2001. Aim is to support the planning, implementation and monitoring of measures to prevent food loss and waste within and outside the G20. The expertise obtained is free of charge for the partners. The collaborations include, among others, capacity building, planning scientific projects, method development, publishing scientific results, policy advice, events for various target groups, supervision of students, exchange of expertise. With the initiative’s global expert database, FLW specialists can be found with just a few clicks, without having to spend time searching in scientific journals. As of October 2023, 166 experts from 41 countries are registered in the database. Together with the respective G20 presidency country, the initiative organizes annual regional workshops on FLW in order to promote networking and exchange. Since 2017, 750 participants from 86 countries have been reached in 6 events. The partners present selected collaborations with the initiative as well as their own topic-related activities in the initiative’s annual report as co-authors.

https://www.macs-g20.org/about-macs/macs-activities/collaboration-initiative-on-food-losses-food-waste-launched-at-macs-g20

Contact Person: Dr. Felicitas Schneider

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty.

Project Description

The Inga Foundation pioneers the revolutionary agricultural system of Inga Alley Cropping (the Inga Tree Model) to address environmentally destructive slash and burn agriculture and food insecurity. Since 2012, the Inga Foundation’s simple agroforestry system of Inga Alley Cropping in Honduras has empowered over 450+ families planting over 6 million trees – dramatically transforming their lives and landscapes..The ability of the resilient Inga tree to anchor, enrich, and regenerate depleted soil provides food security with 100% success for families with 2 year-old alleys. These fast-growing, native Inga species which fix nitrogen in the soil, provide organic cash crops as well as reduce global carbon emissions, protect wildlife and marine habitats, preserve water sources, and yield a year’s worth of renewable firewood. The basic grains/cash crops are grown without herbicides, pesticides, chemical fertilizers, fossil fuels, or heavy equipment. The Inga tree alleys survive 7 months of drought, stop all erosion and mudslides, and protect watersheds. This low-input, debt-free, and bottom-up program of organic regenerative agroforestry is available now and gives families the means to achieve “land for life,” farming their plots with truly sustainable agricultural practices.

About the Institution

Smallholder families using the Inga alley-cropping system have crops that survive during the worst heat, droughts, and hurricanes. The Inga tree alleys survive 7 months of drought and stop all erosion and mudslides–while positively addressing 12 of the 17 United Nations SDGs with no negative impact whatsoever on the remaining 5.This low-input, debt-free, and bottom-up program is available now and gives families the means to achieve “land for life,” farming their plots with truly sustainable agricultural practices. Inga Alley Cropping is not just an alternative to the cutting/ burning of tropical rainforests, it is an integrated solution to stopping it altogether.

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty, Strengthening vulnerable groups.

Project Description

According to the High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition of the FAO (HLPE) are new approaches needed to address the challenges global food systems are facing. “Agroecology and organic agriculture are two such approaches that are gaining attention. They may be particularly well positioned to address the myriad of challenges in our changing world given that their principles and technologies are based on the sustainable use and recycling of renewable resources, equitable social innovation, reconnecting production and consumption, and addressing global concerns and local dynamics. An increasing body of evidence indicates the potential of these approaches, and an increasing number of high-level experts consider this evidence to be “compelling” (HLPE, 2019). The HLPE concluded in its report that what remains is to expand upon this evidence, while at the same time making it more accessible to those in decision-making positions. It is only via this intersection between science and policy that barriers to the adoption of these approaches can be identified and dismantled, and a broader audience educated and empowered to utilise them effectively (HLPE, 2019).

Such evidence as well as training material targeting smallholder farmers in the tropics are the outcome of the ‘long-term farming systems comparison in the tropics (SysCom)’ programme. FiBL is implementing SysCom together with partners from Bolivia, Kenya and India to enhance know-how on potentials and limitations of different agricultural production systems in the three tropical countries. Sound evidence is obtained primarily from the long-term experiments that compare different agricultural production systems (mainly organic and conventional) in Kenya, India and Bolivia. These long-term experiments are complemented with participatory on-farm research (POR), which develops technological innovations and management practices adapted to local farmers’ conditions with a special focus on smallholder conditions.

In January 2024 FiBL will be launching a policy brief entitled “Promising effects of system change” with a view to multiple global crises (i.e., climate change, loss of natural resources soil, biodiversity and food security). The policy dossier describes selected FiBL research results, mainly from Africa, complemented with other international research results and experiences from development cooperation, with the aim of creating an interface between science and policy. The target audience for the policy dossier is decision-makers and experts in the context of international cooperation, from politics to authorities such as representatives or contact persons in the embassies of partner countries. The document is being elaborated with the support of the global project “Knowledge Centre for Organic Agriculture in Africa” commissioned by: German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ).

Beyond that FiBL will also present training materials and approaches for smallholder farming communities describing the findings from the comparative research as well as the manifold innovations developed in the 15 years of participative research. Based on scientific evidence FiBL the material describe best-practice pathways to successful organic and agrocological farming considering economic viability, environmental soundness, and social inclusiveness.

About the Institution

The Research Institute of Organic Agriculture FiBL is one of the world’s leading institutes in the field of organic agriculture. Its locations are situated in Switzerland, Germany, Austria, Hungary (ÖMKI), France and a representation in Brussels through FiBL Europe. FiBL’s strengths lie in interdisciplinary research, innovations developed jointly with farmers and the food industry, solution-oriented development projects and rapid knowledge transfer from research into practice. FiBL has expertise in all areas related to organic farming: soil management and plant production, animal welfare and holistic animal health, socioeconomy, organic food processing and comprehensive analysis of the organic market. Along with practical research, FiBL places a high priority on advisory work, training courses and providing technical expertise (studies, technical leaflets, websites). FiBL has long been committed to the international development of organic agriculture, e.g. with IFOAM – Organics International. For research and development projects, FiBL partners with the European Union (EU), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and other national and international institutions. FiBL facilitates the development of sustainable agriculture in Africa, Asia, Latin America and Eastern Europe in close cooperation with local partners. In long-term trials, FiBL conducts research on local and organic farming systems and offers expertise in market development.

Contact Person: Beate Huber

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty, Strengthening vulnerable groups.

Project Description

Through locally adapted training and educational methods, with a special focus on water-saving production processes and the reduction of CO2 emissions, secure yields in crop production in different climate zones can be stabilized even in the face of changing climate conditions. DEULA Nienburg has developed customized training concepts for various target groups and utilizes digital teaching and learning materials to effectively implement modern blended learning approaches, even in rural areas.

While women in many countries bear significant responsibilities in agriculture, they often face difficulties in accessing general education and, more specifically, in pursuing professional agricultural education and training. This impedes the adoption and development of modern farming techniques, which, in turn, hinders food security and income growth. The same challenges apply to refugees from various regions seeking asylum in other areas. In many cases, a sustainable livelihood is only attainable through engagement in agricultural activities.

Deula Nienburg offers specialized educational and training programs designed to reach marginalized groups, thus improving their income prospects. This can help alleviate the consequences of migration by stabilizing rural areas.

About the Institution

The DEULA Academy is a prominent educational institution with both regional and national significance in Germany. DEULA-Nienburg operates a modern training and education center encompassing a total area of approximately 9,000 square meters, serving around 65,000 man-days/year, making it the largest training facility of its kind in the country.

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty.

Project Description

betterSoil applies four principles towards improving soil health for increased agricultural productivity. These include biochar, compost, agroforestry and soil treatment/management. Biochar, a process of pyrolysis, increases the resistance and fertility of soils, while compost provides the optimal nutrient pool for better soils. Agroforestry meanwhile creates synergetic benefits for soils which in turn ensure the quality and resilience of residing crops and plants. Proper soil management helps the soil establish and maintain the balance of a diverse microbiology. The right methods protect the soil from erosion, increase the productivity and amount of humus (organic matter), promote biodiversity, and protect Earth’s forests. This takes place by removing, bonding, and storing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) as organic carbon.

About the Institution

The betterSoil movement, founded by Azadeh Farajpour, was launched in 2020 at the European level and with the support of the EU Parliament. With specific cultivation practices for building up soil humus, betterSoil connects the findings of science and research with the existing knowledge of farmers around the world. At the same time, betterSoil strives to promote sustainable agriculture not only in practice but also in the political environment and mobilizes decision-makers at the level of the European Parliament, such as Prof. Dr. Ernst Ulrich von Weizsäcker, Dr. Franz Fischler (Former EU Agriculture Commissioner), and Dr. Peter Johnston (European Policy Centre). betterSoil has recently forged a partnership with the UNCCD COP15 Presidency towards rehabilitating and restoring degraded soils. betterSoil is made up of a team of young and motivated soil enthusiasts spread over Germany, Netherlands, Iran, Kenya and Malawi.

Contact Person: Azadeh Farajpour

Selected Topic

Supporting resilient and sustainable supply chains.

Project Description

In Kenya, MEDA is working with SMEs and entrepreneurs in horticulture, poultry and aquaculture providing innovation grants for environmentally sustainable agriculture practices (ESAP) to access inputs needed for these value chains. As examples of this approach on ensuring crop production systems do not accelerate or cause new soil erosion, degradation, worsen economic or social inequalities, exceed water resource replenishment rates, or are otherwise unsustainable or degrade natural resources:

Chicken basket to install a poultry biodigester and use the by product to provide lighting to the facility, and Rio Fish where we are looking to promote modern fish smoking technology from the traditional way of smoking using firewood/charcoal. Another example from Tanzania, where MEDA provided an award to incentive NovFeed to continue growing and allowing the protein to be acessible to more farmers: NovFeed is a biotech company its officially registered and incorporated in 2020. NovFeed has Developed a biotechnological platform designed to transform organic waste into alternative protein ingredients. The company uses natural microbes and industrial biotech that turns organic waste into a highly concentrated protein product with a focus on making nutritious, customizable inputs for the food system, thus enabling meat and aquaculture sectors to get food products.

In the Philippines, MEDA is implementing a project in the cacao sector and incentivizing the use of biodiversity assessments to better understand the impact of changing land use / environment, and farming practices have on local biodiversity, and the relation of biodiversity with crop productivity. Biodiversity assessments and implementation of solutions are not always price accessible. For this reason, MEDA is piloting the use of carbon credits to incentivize practices like soil health management and biodiversity conservation; shade management and biodiversity; safety and health of farmers; and mindset change.

A pilot innovation currently being developed by MEDA and a carbon trading company (KenEco – a subsidiary of a large cacao trading company, Kennemer). The focus of this initiative is to leverage carbon trading as an innovative approach to incentivize cacao producers to adopt sustainable agricultural and resource management practices, ultimately contributing to the mitigation of climate change impacts. This carbon trading initiative is in partnership with a RIISA cooperative (Malabog Integrated Enterprises Development Cooperative). The payment scheme is defined by both the trading company and RIISA partner cooperative–essentially to support the livelihood of cacao farmers and the cacao business of the cooperative.

The rationale behind this approach lies in the significant economic and environmental benefits offered by tree crops such as cocoa. By encouraging small producers to cultivate cocoa under tree canopies, a continuous cash income can be generated from fruit harvesting. This practice helps prevent the burning of forested areas and the destruction of biodiversity habitats, which provides an immediate solution for carbon sequestration. In this way, carbon sequestration can become an additional source of income for farmers, complementing their existing crops.
Another example is from Nicaragua, where MEDA provided a financial incentive to De La Finca. DeLaFinca is an award-winning coffee brand, farm, processor and café chain led by husband and wife partners, Mayerling Gurdián and Heberto Rivas. With MEDA’s incentive, DeLaFinca purchased a coffee roasting machine, obtained export permits and international coffee certification for tasting, and established a coffee ‘lab’ to test and analyze different coffee beans and processes in order to allow the company to strengthen its continuous improvement capacity while providing rapid feedback to coffee bean producers. The lab allowed DeLaFinca to create an innovative and environmentally friendly product using coffee pulp in a carbonated beverage called “Cherry Cola”. MEDA’s incentive was to use technology applied from the farm, in processing techniques, coffee drying and reuse of pulp; as well as the sustainable quality approach that generates benefits throughout the chain. All of this led to the company receiving Excellence Award 2022 provided by a nationally broadcast television program of financial impact and the Central America’s SME of the Year award sponsored by BAC Credomatic, a leading private bank in Central America.

A business that has been a pioneer in promoting a change in the consumption behavior of Nicaraguan coffee through a culture of excellence and sustainable quality throughout the chain and processes of production, processing and marketing of its products, maximizing the benefits to all stakeholders within the company, from the planting of the seed to the preparation of the cup. Founded in 2012 by the fourth generation of a family of small coffee producers, with more than 100 years of experience and tradition, in the town of San Juan de Rio Coco, department of Madriz, began operations in 2013 focusing on processing its coffee and selling it packaged in the corporate segment.

About the Institution

MEDA (Mennonite Economic Development Associates) is an international economic development organization that combats poverty by creating business solutions that are sustainable, scalable, measurable, and replicable. The organization is celebrating 70 years this year and it has worked in over 70 countries supporting entrepreneurs in the producing, processing and marketing of food crops, livestock, poultry and aquaculture. MEDA’s approach is to expand choices and opportunities for entrepreneurs to achieve systems change in the agri-food markets they are operating.

In 2020, MEDA launched a bold strategic plan called “Towards an Equal World,” which aims to create or sustain decent work for 500,000 people in emerging economies by 2030 while focusing its programs on women and youth in the agri-food market system. To achieve this, MEDA is working on creating market systems that are inclusive and sustainable by providing business and technical expertise as well as blended finance to small entrepreneurs and small and medium-sized enterprises. In all its projects, MEDA also follows principles of gender equality and social inclusion, innovation and technology adoption, partnership and contextual knowledge, and environmental sustainability and climate actions to create sustainable solutions and address the systemic inequalities between gender and social groups in the agriculture sector.

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty, Supporting resilient and sustainable supply chains.

Project Description

As a concrete contribution to GFFA 2024, we plan to focus our current work on sustainable production and supply chains. This is where various projects with innovative approaches are currently taking place. One example is the Tanzania Regenerative Production Landscapes project. The innovative landscape approach enables a holistic view of local production systems, in which social, economic and ecological aspects are included and addressed. As a result of the package of measures, both producers are strengthened (secure income in the context of changing conditions as a consequence of climate change) and the environment benefits (conservation of natural resources or ecosystems and strengthening of biodiversity). In addition, joint dialogue strengthens community social capital and creates new business opportunities, including for investors and companies, which in turn benefits producers.

Another innovative initiative on sustainable production systems is planned in Vietnam (applied to the BMEL and shortlisted). The focus here is on the production of spices. Spice production is an important source of income for many farmers in Vietnam and secures income and purchasing power. However, production is often still insufficient due to one-sided production structures.

Here, both the long-term sustainability of the farming system and income opportunities are increased through diversification and expansion of the marketed products. Furthermore, through the use of innovative spatial design approaches, ecological zones and corridors are defined together with producers and authorities, which, as a result of further measures, are characterized by a particularly high level of biodiversity and climate resilience – and enable people to earn a secure income. In addition, an innovative digital product is being created through the development of a Farmers App.

Finally, the circular economy is becoming increasingly important in the context of sustainable production and supply chains. This is where an innovative BMZ-funded project on banana trunks comes in. During harvesting and processing, the trunk is usually seen as a waste product – but valuable resources are lost in the process. In the project, the “waste” is processed into fiber material, which is used for various purposes, e.g. for the production of handicraft products. This project thus also contributes to the 3rd sub-theme Loss and Waste.

About the Institution

Helvetas Intercooperation gGmbH (hereinafter referred to as Helvetas Germany) is a German non-governmental organization based in Bonn that is committed to improving the living conditions of disadvantaged people and vulnerable groups in partner countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. It contributes to poverty reduction through targeted development projects in rural areas.

It is part of the Helvetas network, which also includes Helvetas Swiss Intercooperation (parent company) and Helvetas USA. Helvetas Germany is politically and denominationally neutral. In total, the NGO has implemented projects in 15 countries since 2013.

Since 2016, 24 projects have been successfully completed. Currently, Helvetas Germany has 13 ongoing projects. In 2022, the income was over 2.1 Mil. and for this year an increase to over 3,5 Mil. is expected.
In our project work, we pay particular attention to helping people to help themselves, the targeted promotion of women and girls, and the sustainable use of natural resources. Our activities focus on access to clean water, food security, education and income generation.

We strengthen food systems by enabling people to secure their land rights, apply forward-looking methods in agriculture and increase the availability of healthy and affordable food.

Contact Person: Martin Koppa

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty, Supporting resilient and sustainable supply chains, Reducing food loss and waste, Strengthening vulnerable groups.

Project Description

AFC has been implementing EU and BMZ-funded GIZ programmes in Ghana since 2009, currently with the project “Sustainable Employment through Agribusiness (AgriBiz)”. We support over 47,000 farmers and more than 700 agro-processing companies, adding value to agricultural raw materials and creating employment opportunities in Ghana. In addition, AFC supports decentralised Ghanaian Business Development Service (BDS) Providers to offer tailored service packages to farmers and agro-processors. Making supply chains more resilient is key to our work. We provide technical advice to farms and agro-processing companies to become certified according to sustainability standards. Moreover, we support agro-processors in facilitating inclusive contract farming schemes to strengthen the sustainability of their supply chains. Specific support packages are promoted for women-owned enterprises, who often face peculiar challenges, e.g. regarding accessing finance.

Examples of activities along the supply chains include the:

  • promotion of self-help approaches for vulnerable groups such as the Village Savings and Loan Associations (VSLAs).
  • support of specialised service providers promoting conservation agriculture,
  • commercial introduction of locally produced neem oil as a safe biopesticide,
  • introduction of a recycling system for used agrochemical bottles,
  • use of farm waste as energy source for shea butter production.

Various videos exist and could be displayed, demonstrating the project’s achievements.

About the Institution

AFC Agriculture & Finance Consultants is a private German consulting firm focusing on agricultural, agribusiness and financial development projects in developing and transition countries. 2007, AFC became member of GOPA Consulting Group, Germany’s largest group of consulting firms in development cooperation. Our services for public organisations and private companies in Agriculture & Agribusiness cover the whole range from primary production to processing and marketing. Financial Sector Development focuses on developing credit and saving products and establishing regulation and supervision systems. AFC is currently implementing approximately 100 projects with more than 1,000 staff in over 50 countries. Most of them cover at least one of the relevant topics of the 2024 GFFA Innovation Forum:

  • Strengthen sustainable production and food sovereignty, e.g. by successfully implementing seven Green Innovation Centres (GIZ)
  • Promote resilient and sustainable supply chains, e.g. through ten ongoing projects in organic production
  • Reduce food loss and waste, e.g with cold storages in Moldova with photovoltaic and waste water treatment (EU)
  • Strengthen vulnerable groups: numerous projects addressing minorities, e.g. refugees in Uganda (GIZ)

Since establishment of the Bilateral Cooperation Programme, AFC has been active in its project implementation. Presently, we are executing ten projects funded by BMEL.

Contact Person: Alexander Lotz

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty.

Project Description

While digital agriculture has received considerable attention to improve efficiency, productivity and food security, less attention has been given to the potential of digitalization towards sustainable development, for example through biodiversity conservation and climate change mitigation. This, in large part, can be attributed to the conflicts between goals in land management. The harmonization of these conflicting goals through an optimally balanced provision of ecosystem services, represents a major opportunity for sustainable land management.

In response to this challenge, a consortium of researchers from ten scientific institutions, led by the Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), is spearheading a groundbreaking initiative aimed at revolutionizing agriculture. This project, known as the “Digital Agricultural Knowledge and Information System”, is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. DAKIS aims to integrate ecosystem service and biodiversity assessment information with resource efficiency methodologies into the decision-making processes of farmers. Central to DAKIS is the integration of digitization tools, such as sensors, computer models, and robotics to enhance economic efficiency and simultaneously promote environmental sustainability in agricultural practices. By introducing innovative, site-specific farming techniques, DAKIS aims to harmonize food production with the preservation and enhancement of biodiversity and essential ecosystem services, such as clean water and fertile soils. This endeavor opens up exciting possibilities for innovative products, novel business models, and the creation of new communication channels for cooperation between farmers, consumers and society. Since 2019, over 30 researchers from diverse fields, including agricultural research, economics, sociology, computer science, and legal studies, are collaborating closely to bring this future vision to fruition.

About the Institution

The mission of ZALF is to deliver solutions for an economically, environmentally and socially sustainable agriculture – together with society.

As a contribution to overcoming global challenges such as climate change, food security, biodiversity conservation and resource scarcity, we develop and design crop systems, integrated in their landscape contexts, that combine food security with sustainability. Therefore we process complex landscape data with a unique set of experimental methods, new technologies and models as well as socio-economic approaches.

ZALF research is integrated systems research: starting from processes in soils and plants to causal relationships on the field and landscape level up to global impacts and complex interactions between landscapes, society and economy.

According to its statutes, ZALF serves “the public welfare by communicating scientific insights to the relevant sections of the population, technical communities and business circles”. ZALF research stands explicitly for scientific excellence and social relevance.

Contact Person: Karoline Hemminger

Selected Topic

Promoting sustainable production and food sovereignty.

Project Description

Food for Biodiversity has developed a comprehensive basic set of biodiversity criteria for agriculture and the food sector. One version contains biodiversity-promoting measures for European growing regions, one version focuses on tropical and subtropical growing regions. The basic sets are an important basis for the implementation of our pilot projects. Our members have committed to (jointly) carry out pilot projects, set up biodiversity action plans and implement measures to promote biodiversity. The first pilot projects are currently ending. The lessons learned from them are being incorporated into the revision of the basic sets. The aim is to create awareness for more biodiversity protection, further development of standards and purchasing requirements with regard to biodiversity in agricultural production.

About the Institution

With the association Food for Biodiversity, we, representatives of companies, associations and standards from the food industry and environmental protection, are making an ambitious statement: We want to make a decisive contribution to the protection of biodiversity and against the extinction of species. The promotion, restoration and preservation of biodiversity as the basis of food production is at the centre of our work. Our members, including food producers and traders, standards and other industry players, scientific institutions and environmental organisations, are committed to implementing measures that anchor the protection of biodiversity in the food industry and its upstream value chains. How we promote biodiversity in the food industry: Establish effective biodiversity criteria in purchasing and food standards; Trainings for employees, farmers, advisors, and auditors; Promotion of research and pilot projects on biodiversity; Advocacy for a biodiversity-freindly policy framework; Resources to raise awareness among consumers; Support for farmers in the implementation of the criteriy and measures.

Contact Person: Ralph Dejas


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